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Picking New NBA Teams with Adam McGee — TWT 103

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Hey there, and welcome to episode 103 of the Timeout with Ti podcast. I was joined by my good friend and fellow co-expert at Behind the Buck Pass, Adam McGee, for an interesting and fresh discussion this time around.

Adam and I decided to rank the top five NBA teams we would support if we had to pick a new squad today. Neither of us could pick the Milwaukee Bucks, Adam couldn’t pick his first love, the Atlanta Hawks, and I couldn’t take the Sacramento Kings, who I covered for a few months a couple summers ago.

Our lists had some similarities, but in a bold move my number one choice caused me to, in Adam’s words, “sink to a new low.” It’s a really fun episode, and I’m interested in hearing which teams you listeners would pick if you had to.

Let me know that on Twitter (@TiWindisch) by tweeting me or at the pod (@TimeoutwithTi). You should follow those accounts, plus Adam’s (@AdamMcGee11) as well.

Also please check out Timeout with Ti and Press Basketball on Facebook, and all 103 (!!!!) episodes of the show that are located on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher plus on the show’s home on Soundcloud and here on the fantastic Press Basketball website. Feel free to subscribe, rate, review, share and email your friends to show them how good the podcast is! Also shoutout to Joey Burbs, who I forgot in my plugs on air. Sorry, Joey!

Ti is a writer, editor, and podcast host who’s work can be found at Behind the Buck Pass, The Step Back, Press Basketball, and wherever podcasts can be found. He’s the host of Timeout with Ti, a typically-NBA themed pod that features one guest and has a more conversational feel than a standard interview. He loves the Milwaukee Bucks and is not here for your mispronunciation of Giannis Antetokounmpo.

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The Break

Dads & Draft Picks | The Break | Episode 9

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What player needs a new home?

The Lakers’ rebranded “LaVar Ball Rule.”

And rookie reconsideration?

 

Hosts’ Twitters:

Phil Boileau: twitter.com/SportingPhil
Justin Rowan: twitter.com/Cavsanada
Meaghan Engels: twitter.com/meaghan_e

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Editorial

Progression is Power: On Social Justice in the NBA

The path to becoming the most progressive major sports league in the world hasn’t been a simple one.

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Art by Meaghan Engels

Cyntoia Brown and Trayvon Martin. Two names that went viral on social media, two teens that were both failed by the American criminal justice system, two lives that ended far too young, and two people that gained the attention of NBA All-Star LeBron James. Trayvon Martin was tragically gunned down while returning from the corner store with a drink and candy in his hand. His killer was never brought to justice, but instead was acquitted of second degree murder and manslaughter. Cyntoia Brown was 16 when she shot and killed a man that had solicited her for sex after being forced into prostitution. She was tried as an adult and sentenced to 51 years to life for first degree murder. James chose to reach out to his roughly 30 million followers across his social media platforms to demand justice for these individuals. But this story doesn’t start with Martin and won’t end with Brown. This story is more about the social justice movement in the NBA that has been in the making for decades, inspired by individuals just like these.

Earlier this year the NBA placed itself into a category of its own in an unprecedented move across the sports community. Commissioner Adam Silver and Players Association Executive Director Michele Roberts co-signed a letter for players encouraging their social awareness and pledged their full support. In an excerpt obtained by ESPN, part of the letter reads:

None of us operates in a vacuum. Critical issues that affect our society also impact you directly. Fortunately, you are not only the world’s greatest basketball players — you have real power to make a difference in the world, and we want you to know that the Players Association and the League are always available to help you figure out the most meaningful way to make that difference.

To the public the NBA might look like a leader in the industry, but it has never been a short or easy journey. To understand how far the league has come we have to look back at its controversial past.

I’ll start with the more recent history of the Chicago Bulls NBA championship visit to the White House in 1992. A dashiki-donned Craig Hodges showed up with a handwritten letter to former United States President George H. W. Bush opposing the administration’s treatment of the poor and minority communities. That same year Hodges was then waived by the Bulls and failed to receive an offer or tryout from any of the other 29 teams. Hodges was only 32 at the time and not only a three-time three-point shootout champion, but a two-time NBA champion. Four years later he filed a $40 million lawsuit against the league and its teams claiming they blackballed him. In his complaint he listed reasons that included his association with African-American social activist Louis Farrakhan, and his criticism of other African-American professional athletes not using their wealth and influence to enact change, most notably calling out former teammate Michael Jordan.

That same year the league saw more controversy when Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf refused to stand for the American anthem in protest against a country and flag he deemed a symbol of oppression and a conflict with his Islamic beliefs. The league’s commissioner at the time, David Stern, handed Abdul-Rauf a suspension that carried a $31,707 fine for each game missed. It seemed like a clear message from the league to its players: Either stay in line or there will be consequences.

It then took almost a decade for Steve Nash to place himself in the middle of political controversy by sporting a shirt during the Mavericks’ pregame warmups that read: “No War. Shoot for Peace.” Progression was happening slow in the social athletic world, but two years later the Wizards’ Etan Thomas echoed his sentiments and developed his own reputation as a political activist by delivering a powerful anti-war speech at a rally.

The cries of players’ voices did not go unnoticed as the NBA started to see entire teams rally around social justice causes. Nash (traded to the Phoenix Suns) was placing himself in the center of controversy again—this time being joined by the team’s managing partner. Together, the two of them lead the “Los Suns” movement. The team sported custom jerseys for a playoff game against the San Antonio Spurs in support of the Hispanic community that was facing Arizona’s highly controversial law heavily criticized for encouraging racial profiling.

Less than two years later, the league would see one of its most recognizable pictures to date and it would be the beginning of the movement of players and teams proudly standing together in unison in an attempt to enact change for individuals being targeted—predominantly in the black community. In Florida, the Miami Heat were only a few miles away from where Trayvon Martin was shot and killed after walking through a gated neighbourhood back to his uncle’s house wearing a hooded sweatshirt. Dwyane Wade’s wife, Gabrielle Union, brought the issue to her husband’s attention and in a revolutionary move, LeBron James and Wade spent several days planning a social justice plan of action. All it took was a photo that spoke a thousand words and a hashtag that read #WeAreTrayvonMartin.

The killing of an unarmed black man, or in this case, a child of only 17 years old, is not anything new for many people in America. This time it happened to hit Wade a lot harder than he ever expected.

In an interview with the Associated Press, Wade stated, “This situation hit home for me because last Christmas all my oldest son wanted as a gift was hoodies. So when I heard about this a week ago, I thought of my sons. I’m speaking up because I feel it’s necessary that we get past the stereotype of young, black men and especially with our youth.”

This was also one of the first times where it seemed a social issue was spreading beyond individual players, beyond a single team, and was being acknowledged league-wide. Further acknowledgement towards Martin’s death was displayed by New York Knicks teammates Amar’e Stoudemire and Carmelo Anthony. Although we may not know the depth to the role that the Heat and players across the NBA actually played in garnering attention to Martin’s death, there was still traction and at that same time a Change.org petition had already gained almost 1.5 million signatures. Wade had retweeted CNN journalist Roland Martin’s tweet asking people to keep using their voices to demand justice. A Florida lawmaker further pushed Heat players to show up to pregames in hooded sweatshirts, and although the NBA’s uniform policy didn’t allow it, James and Wade were seen with “We Want Justice” and “R.I.P. Trayvon Martin” written on their sneakers. And in yet another groundbreaking move, the National Basketball Players Association released a powerful statement not only listing the standard condolences but went further to call for a permanent resignation of the Sanford Chief of Police and a full review of its police department as well.

Trayvon Martin. Eric Garner. Freddie Grey. Alton Sterling. Philando Castile. Cyntoia Brown.

These names are far from the only ones that should have gained attention over the years, however, in the case of Eric Garner, players and teams across the league were seen protesting his killing by wearing “I CAN’T BREATHE” shirts during warmups. Under new Commissioner Adam Silver, the NBA had taken a step forward by choosing not to fine players for not wearing Adidas as the league rules require. Silver stated his respect for players voicing their personal views but added that he would still prefer they abide by the rules. Over the years he has continued to progressively lead the way in the sporting community. In addition to not fining players for violating league rules with their shirts, he had previously fought to remove Donald Sterling as L.A. Clippers owner after his racist comments went public. The NBA commissioner has also shown his support for the LGBTQ community by withdrawing an All-Star game in Charlotte after it passed a discriminatory bathroom bill, and rode on a float the past two consecutive years in New York City’s pride parade.

The players, the coaches, the owners, and Silver have all taken the NBA to new places as it’s become the most progressive across the four major sports leagues (Major League Baseball, the National Hockey League, the National Football League, and the National Basketball Association). If you’ll recall, it was not so long ago when players, most famously Michael Jordan, refused to address political issues in fear of hurting their brand or alienating some fans. Jordan has had the quote, “Republicans buy shoes too,” follow him throughout his career and life, and regardless of whether or not he actually said those words, he publicly refused to take any political stances during his time as a player. It’s uncertain whether or not the movements of players have forced the league to progress, or the NBA’s adaptability has allowed the players to. But second to the changes in the league has been most recently MJ himself. Last year, he took the opportunity to speak out for what was possibly the first time in his career.

In a statement published to ESPN entitled, “I Can No Longer Stay Silent,” MJ wrote, “As a proud American, a father who lost his own dad in a senseless act of violence, and a black man, I have been deeply troubled by the deaths of African-Americans at the hands of law enforcement and angered by the cowardly and hateful targeting and killing of police officers.”

The former apolitical player and current Charlotte Hornets principal owner and chairman also donated $2 million between the Institute for Community-Police Relations and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Whatever caused him to finally use his voice proves that change is possible.

In LeBron’s famous 2014 Sports Illustrated article, he said, “I feel my calling here goes above basketball. I have a responsibility to lead …”

James has arguably been the most politically vocal sports figure (especially since Donald Trump took office) and one can only conclude there’s no silencing him in the future. His and others’ voices across the NBA and the rest of the sporting community are so important today and will only continue to grow and inspire others in sports to speak up and hopefully one day provide justice to those like Trayvon Martin or Cyntoia Brown.

Progression is possible, and if the NBA is any indication, I think it simply proves the point that athletes should absolutely not just “stick to sports, and that social change is possible. I look forward to the future where sports figures, celebrities and those in positions of power will all use their voices to inspire and enact change in their communities and our society.

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Timeout with Ti

Detroit Pistons talk with Duncan Smith — TWT 107

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Art by Andrew Hamilton

Hey there! The Detroit Pistons are fun and pretty good, so it’s time to talk about them again. To do so, I brought my man Duncan Smith on the latest episode of Timeout with Ti.

We bounced around a variety of Pistons topics, including how Andre Drummond has changed his game, how Detroit has done well without a standout star, and where the team will finish the year compared to the rest of the Eastern Conference.

Duncan and I couldn’t help but talk about some other Association-related topics as well, including Stephen Curry’s injury and which of James Harden and LeBron James deserves to win MVP based on how they’ve both started the season.

If you liked this or any episode, please follow me (@TiWindisch), the podcast (@TimeoutwithTi), and Duncan (@DuncanSmithNBA) on Twitter if you enjoyed the episode!

Please check out Timeout with Ti and Press Basketball on Facebook, and listen to the other 106 episodes of the pod that are located on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher plus on the show’s dope home on Soundcloud and here on the super dope Press Basketball website. Also, huge shout out to Joey Burbs, who is still your favorite podcast host’s favorite rapper.

If you enjoyed this or any episode of Timeout with Ti, please take the time to subscribe, rate, review, and tell your friends to help the show keep on growing.

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